Full-Length Animated Feature Films


    In order by the year of their first debut:

    1. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, 1937.
    2. Pinocchio, 1940.
    3. Fantasia, 1940.
    4. Dumbo, 1941.
    5. Bambi, 1942.
    6. Saludos Amigos, 1943.
    7. The Three Caballeros, 1945.
    8. Make Mine Music, 1946.
    9. Fun and Fancy Free, 1947.
    10. Melody Time, 1948.
    11. The Adventures of Icabod and Mr. Toad, 1949.
    12. Cinderella, 1950.
    13. Alice In Wonderland, 1951.
    14. Peter Pan, 1953.
    15. Lady And The Tramp, 1955.
    16. Sleeping Beauty, 1959.
    17. 101 Dalmations, 1961.
    18. The Sword And The Stone, 1963.
    19. The Jungle Book, 1967.
    20. The Aristocats, 1970.
    21. Robin Hood, 1973.
    22. The Many Adventures Of Winnie The Pooh, 1977.
    23. The Rescuers, 1977.
    24. The Fox And The Hound, 1981.
    25. The Black Cauldron, 1985.
    26. The Great Mouse Detective, 1986.
    27. Oliver & Company, 1988.
    28. The Little Mermaid, 1989.
    29. The Rescuers Down Under, 1990.
    30. Beauty And The Beast, 1991.
    31. Aladdin, 1992.
    32. The Lion King, 1994.
    33. Pocahontas, 1995.
    34. The Hunchback Of Notre Dame, 1996.
    35. Hercules, 1997.
    36. Mulan, 1998.
    37. Tarzan, 1999.

    Fantasia 2000 was released nationwide on January 1, 2000,
    starting a 4-month IMAX exclusive showing.
    It is composed of eight segments -
    The Sorcerer's Apprentice from the original Fantasia
    and seven new segments:

      Beethoven's Fifth Symphony, Ludwig von Beethoven
      Pines of Rome, Ottorino Respighi
      Rhapsody in Blue, George Gershwin
      Piano Concerto No. 2, Allegro, Opus 102, Dmitri Shostakovich
      Carnival of the Animals, Camille Saint-Sans
      The Sorcerer's Apprentice, Paul Dukas
      Pomp and Circumstance, Sir Edward Elgar
      Firebird Suite - 1919 Version, Igor Stravinsky

      The Disney spectrum of films expanded to include new forms of animation. The color and flavor of Disney films is difficult to maintain in chronology as the corporate climate shifts and slides in an evolving corporate identity. The Disney family vision no longer acts as a significant influence. Times are changing, though each year block buster animations maintain the inventory of exciting new films, but far beyond the scope of this work.


Disney characters are trademarks of The Walt Disney Company

About the author Robert L. Seltman


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